The SLIM LIVER Study

FOR PEOPLE LIVING WITH HIV WITH NON-ALCOHOLIC FATTY LIVER DISEASE

fatty liver.png

The UW AIDS Clinical Trials Unit is looking for people living with HIV 18 and older who have been taking HIV medicines for at least 1 year and undetectable for at least 24 weeks who have been diagnosed with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease by imaging at a pre-entry visit.

ABOUT THIS STUDY

It is estimated that 30-40% of adults living with HIV have non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). NAFLD is the buildup of extra fat in the liver cells that is not caused by alcohol.

Treating NAFLD may have far-reaching benefits, including reduction of insulin resistance and prevention or treatment of cardiovascular disease, which is often associated with NAFLD.

The SLIM LIVER Study will investigate the effects of two drugs, liraglutide and sitagliptin to see if either one will reduce liver fat in people with HIV and if they have any effect on factors that are associated with the development of fatty liver disease.

Participants will be randomized (like flipping a coin) to one of two groups:

Group 1: Liraglutide, by self-adminietered injection every day

Group 2: Sitagliptin, by mouth every day

Study drugs will be taken for 36 weeks. Length of entire study is about 48 weeks

REQUIREMENTS

  • People living with HIV

  •  Ages 18 and older

  •  On HIV medicine for at least 1 year

  •  Undetectable HIV viral load for 24 weeks

  •  Have fatty liver disease (diagnosed by imaging at a pre-entry visit)

  •  CD4 T cell count of at least 200 .

  •  No diabetes

  •  No heavy drinking (alcoholic drinks)

  •  No active Hepatitis B or C

PLUS:

  • MEDICAL HISTORIES

  •  PHYSICAL EXAMS

  •  BLOOD DRAWS

  •  QUESTIONNAIRES

  •  A 3-DAY FOOD DIARY

  •  AND STOOL COLLECTION.

 

$20 for each visit starting at the Screening Visit.

Exams, tests and the study medicines are provided AT NO COST to you.

INTERESTED?

Please contact Clay Youngblood 206-773-7129  (call or text)

for more information or to schedule a screening appointment.

Treating Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease
in People Living with HIV